En français
In english

Landscaping with Nadia Huggins and Richard Fung

This article aims to investigate the subjective, cultural value of landscapes behind the representations of the landscapes themselves, in a conversation with the Caribbean artists Nadia Huggins and Richard Fung.

Nadia Huggins was born in Trinidad (TT) and grew up in Saint Vincent. She is a photographer and visual artist who works on landscapes underwater and on land. Her works Transformations (2014-2016) and Is that a buoy? (2015), question the blurring etiquettes between performativity and gender representation from and within the landscapes themselves. Richard Fung, from Trinidad (TT) and Canada, is an experimental movie director and visual artist. He worked explicitly on the thematic of the landscape with his installation Landscapes shown at McMaster University Museum of Art in 2008, where he transformed the pastoral landscape of J.-M.-W.-Turner with superpositions of videos questioning the relations between copy and original and between First Nation lands and colonial representation of the same lands. Among his video-documentaries Islands (2002) analyzes the relation between the Caribbean landscape and the cinematic image.

This article is the elaboration of a discussion between the three of us on the socio-critical values and memories that lie behind the artists’ representation of their tropical landscapes. When I met the artists, my goal was to understand which invisible elements exist beyond the visuality of the landscapes themselves. Starting from the etymology of the term landscape, I asked the artists to dig into their experiences of “being shaped” by the land and how they “shape” it artistically, since landscape comes from the ancient Dutch word “scape”, which means to shape land. With this discussion I asked the artists to go through and beyond the visuality of the landscapes themselves, sharing their cultural background, memories and emotional connections with the landscapes that envelop the artists and their lives.

Landscape etymologically refers to the act of shaping the land through a visual action. The landscape is therefore by definition linked to a visual scape that the artist creates through the photographic and cinematic medium. However, the landscape does not only imply a space that is modified by visual command (Gómez-Barris 2017); it in fact shapes the inhabitants’ way of living (Filipucci 2016) and it is a way of creating social and subjective identities (Mitchell 2002). Therefore, a landscape is also a practiced space (De Certeau 1984), a shared one (Ingold 2000), a relational one (Glissant 1997) and a cultural one (Sim 2011).

The scopophilic pleasure of the landscape is reversed in this conversation. First, we analyze the landscape as a practiced space and a relational space. Only at the end of this text, do we discuss the landscape as a visual scape. In conclusion: this article is meant to discover where the landscape “touches” the artists’ lives, experiences and gazes in a haptic manner, which is translated visually in their artistic works afterwards.

Land-scaping

According to the European Landscape Convention (2000: 9), the landscape is an area as perceived by people, whose character is the result of action and interactions between human and nature. In preparation for our conversation, I asked the artists to share some images of their past, showing the landscape of “their” Caribbean link with their socio-emotional and sensorial connections they have with them. With this request it was my wish to see how the landscape, as a practiced space, becomes a mnemonic device that evokes “living memories” (Shelter 2007). The goal of this discussion was to discover relational spaces (Glissant 2009) that landscapes provide as soon as they are perceived as lived places.

Both artists sent childhood photos of being at the beach. Richard Fung presented a photo of Maracas Beach, located in the North of the island of Trinidad, in the 1960s (Photo 1). Nadia Huggins shared her family photo (Photo 2) along with her portrait as a child in Indian Bay’s water in Saint Vincent (Photo 3). This bay is still the base of her underwater photography.

Richard Fung’s family photo album, Maracas beach, Trinidad, TT, 1960s.

Nadia Huggins, her mother and sister, 1980s.

Nadia Huggins’ portrait at Indian bay, Saint Vincent, 1980s.

After this first sharing of photos it was clear that the notion of landscape, with its literal emphasis on the “land”, was accompanied by the presence of the water for them. Etymologically island, “is-land” and in ancient English “īegland”, means watery land. According to its etymology, the islands’ natural and national landscapes of both artists are literally lands delimited or “shaped” by water. From their photos, the waterscape in their lived landscapes is integrated into the notion of landscape. In accordance to the archipelagic thinking (Glissant 1996) that allows us to think the Caribbean through its plurality and diversity but to consider it in its counterpunctual relational polyphony at the same time (Benítez-Rojo 1996), the vision of the artists, their memories and way of perceiving their tropical landscape, are at times similar and different.

The visual act that shapes the emotional sense provided by each landscape has opposite directions. For Nadia Huggins it is described as “looking back” to the land, whereas for Richard Fung it is “looking out from the land”. Nadia Huggins states:

“I think that my strongest memories of the landscape growing up, was always being in the sea and looking back[1] at the island to see that figure over, like a mountain. For me it has always been that specific visuality that makes you really aware that you are on an island. Being physically on land and looking at the sea does not really make you feel that you are on an island. It’s usually when you look back at the island that you realize that you are in a small space. […] It’s part of the reason why most of my work took that perspective from being in the water. It always has a sense of looking back to the land, seeing people on the beach[2]. You just have this sense of hyperawareness on how specifically small the space is.”

Richard Fung:

“The images that I sent [Photo1] were taken in the late 1960s. I noticed a man, who I assume to be a surfer, performing a kind of act of hetero-masculinity. The surfer dude, someone who was not so commonly seen in the 1960s, brings up the question of class and race. When I made a film with Christopher Cozier[3] in 2005, he talked about the beach saying that on an island you’re always “looking out[4]”, which is true for me.”

Nadia Huggins and Richard Fung describe different sensations in living within their related tropical landscapes. For Nadia, it is by looking from the sea to the land that she feels the sense of belonging to a small place, as Saint Vincent is, compared to Trinidad. For Richard on the contrary, the land gives him an opposite force: he looks out from the land to the sea, as an evasive motion.

This recognition allows them to have a different relation with their landscapes. For Nadia, her landscape is characterized by the feeling of an imposed strength of nature, caused by the presence of the volcano that structured her island, the imminent possibility that there could be an eruption and by the fact that Saint Vincent is affected by hurricane seasons, where the weather impacts and shapes the inhabitants on the island. Nadia:

“Even though the volcano didn’t erupt since 1979, there is an understanding that at any moment it can just decide to blow. I always have the understanding that at any moment something can happen. There’s always the feeling of life changing with actions of natural disaster that can completely change the landscape. So there’s a part of me that thinks that I have a kind of responsibility to document things. This awareness is always on the back of my mind. Just seeing what’s happening with the weather. For me the feeling that you and the island can be destroyed because of something that you don’t have control over, is always present.”

Differently, Richard evokes his relations between a suburban-scape of the capital of Trinidad and the experience of nature-scape inherited from his parents. In his discourse, there is the acknowledgment of having the sense of a liminal experience of the landscape. He shares:

“I grew up very middle class, but my parents both came from poor rural settings. […] When I made a movie about my mom[5], we went back to Moruga[6] and she started naming all the plants and their health properties, which I didn’t have since I grew up in the city. My childhood was suburban, not urban. So, my own orientation to the landscape was from the suburban orientation, but still very much at the mercy of nature. The streets would flood and as a child you would play with those little popsicle sticks, making little boats in the canal. […] You know, here [in Toronto, Canada] drains disappear into the ground. Even when it rains, you’re not aware of the impact of nature.”

The beach for him, as a Trinidadian born in an urban landscape in the north of the country, was on a counterpoint with where he spent his life:

“Most of my life I was circumscribed by the hills around the St. Ann’s Valley, since this was where our house was located. I grew up with the visual relationship to that specific landscape, where you can see the hills […] There was a hotel “Belvedere”, bel-vedere, that was owned by a foreigner. It was one of the few hotels with a view of Port of Spain.”

Fung evokes the relation with the gazed landscapes due to the youthful impossibility to move, so he was observing the north of the island:

“As you know in Trinidad the rain moves. You can see the rain coming across the hills from the north-east. If we were visiting a neighbor someone would shout, “rain coming!” and we had to run back to the house, close the windows and put the pots out for the drips, because the rain would fall from the roof. My landscape was circumscribed by these geological walls of the valley. So being in Maracas Beach and looking out to the sea was actually an escape and very different from most of our lives. Differently to what most people might think when you are from a tropical island, where it is assumed that you are on the beach most of the time, in urban Trinidad we don’t really have easy access to the beaches; it requires a trip to get there.”

However, for our discussion, he decided to share three beaches as experienced landscapes: Maracas Beach (Photo1), Chacachacare Beach (by the ancient leper colony located on Chacachacare Island, the closest one to Venezuela) and Macqueripe, a USA navy beach situated in the north of the island. The landscape directly provides Richard “body feelings”. He continues looking at Photo 1:

“In that period showers were not constructed yet in Maracas. That feeling of going to the beach as well as the process of getting there partly through the forest, was always exciting to me. […] The feeling that you immediately had was the feeling of stickiness of the salt on your skin. You would probably sit on your towel, because you would get the car seat dirty, even though the car seat was probably covered with plastic. There was the idea to wash the car as soon as you got back home and there was this obsession of not parking the car close to the sea, or it would get rusty.”

Portraying “placeness” raises the question of the human and non-human dimension (Pinney 1995). For Richard specifically, Maracas Beach becomes a performative space where gender, class and race are portrayed and affirmed. He described Maracas Beach as the fashionable one, while nearby Tyrico Beach was mainly frequented by Indo-Trinidadians. During our discussion, the notion of class appears from the landscapes they frequented. This is performed on the surface of the waterscape, on the land where visibility is interplayed. Connecting with his memory he evokes Macqueripe Beach:

“Macqueripe was still part of the American base. So, my parents had a membership that was linked to their class aspirations, and we would enter into another landscape. You know, the culture of the landscape was very interesting. As soon as you crossed this check point, the land looked different. It was so manicured, the architecture was different and the houses had mosquito nets, something Trinidadians don’t even have today.”

Nadia continues describing her lived landscape, Indian Bay, that is frequented by the local population of Saint Vincent. She says:

“There is a strange combination of white and black sand, and it’s easily accessible […] so a lot of people from inland come. It’s known as a local beach. That’s my experience of going to the beach where I feel integrated into the community. I also come from a middle class and working-class family, and my parents found a way to negotiate those differences and understood that me going to that particular beach was important in a sense of gaining an understanding on how people on the island thought and function. I was encouraged to do so from an early age.”

Her childhood experiences of that beach create a familiarity with the subjects of her contemporary photography projects where young frequenters of the beach interact with the water, where she takes the photos from specifically for her project Circa No Future:

“[…] because that was also my experience growing-up. There is a part of me that strains to reconnect to that part of my youth. Where I felt like a young black boy in that regard […] I was hanging out with those guys, jumping off the rocks. I was the only girl in the group doing what they were doing. […] As I got up, I recognized that my body and my skin color were different. So there is a part of me that now tries to explore that.”

Richard Fung and his family in Macqueripe Beach, TT, 1960s.

Nadia Huggins and her cousin, Indian Bay, Saint Vincent, 1990s.

Different from Richard, Nadia links the landscape and the space of the beach as a gendered one.

“In Saint Vincent the beach is more a gendered space. You have more boys that swim instead of girls, which could mainly be because of the family tendency. Boyhood has a kind of rite of passage into manhood with the water, which girls don’t have. Girls are less inclined to do so, maybe because of the question of their hair.”

Nadia refers indirectly to her introspective work here, caused by an immunity disease, which made her lose her hair. Because of (or thanks to) not having long hair, that responds to the most superficial female stereotypes, when she is in the water she queers her gendered representation and is able to visually investigate the gendered performances of boyhood on the beach without being perceived at first sight as a woman. According to our discussion, the surface of the sea creates a kind of filter that according to both artists, dismantles the performative construction of gender.

Richard:

“It’s nice to see this kind of counterpoint, where here [in Photo1] the surfer embodies and shows his masculinity, whereas with Nadia’s works, the water dissolves gender because she enters the water. […] I snorkel since I was a kid, and the world opens up to you when you are going below this surface. The feeling of water is a kind of a transcendent space. I kind of feel Nadia’s photos.”

And Nadia replies:

“People perform when they are seen. Once you go below the water you lose this awareness. Without the construct of who you are supposed to be when you are on land, you kind of return to a primal sense of identity. Because the human body should not live under water, it’s very difficult to perform when you have to survive. It’s there, where gender is dissolved to me.”

The experience of being immersed in the waterscape suspends the performances of class and gender. The sensorial sense of being not just surrounded by water, but being “touched” by the water, makes the human feel whole with the waterscape. As soon as the surface of the water is crossed, it becomes a liminal tool that, according to Nadia, functions like the action of masking in carnival where the landscape is humanized and the human is naturalized. Nadia continues:

“You can compare it to carnival. You dress up in order to conceal your identity and it allows a certain kind of performance to happen. We use the landscape in that same way. We can perform the acts that we deeply desire […] The sea to me is a kind of democratic space where all the constructs that exist on lands dissolve. When you’re underwater, you’re below the horizon, in a process of self-transformation with nature.”

Nadia evokes the possibility to be classless and genderless when a person is diving in the waters. On the contrary, the land hosts a “contact-zone” of transformations that involves the economic value of the land that becomes an estate, the land as a right and a deprivation, as a sense of ownership and a sense of transgression, all derived from the plantation value of land ownerships (Gerber Hess 2017; Hollsten 2008). In the Caribbean region, the lands were “fields” of contention for power relations that included racial, ethnic, gender and religious separatism. The lands here are objectivized by the human being. However, both artists are interested in the learning process from the landscape, evoking it as a “pedagogy of the land”. Richard continues:

“You are so right Nadia! When I was a child in Trinidad, I was so aware of the light and the sun! I was waking up right before the sun came up, you could see that particular light coming through the leaves. In a large city like Toronto you have to remember it, because there’s light everywhere all the time.”

The light is an important element for Nadia as well since this is linked to the moment of the day she shoots her photographs. I asked about the cultural value of darkness in relation to their landscapes. Both artists mentioned their childhood and the link with the supernatural that is inscribed in the dark landscape. There is an interactive relation (Humphrey 1995) between the lands, the water and the viewer. The lands are inhabited by ancestral beings (Shelter 2007) and the landscape symbolizes a co-presence of time, where the past and the present constantly communicate (Toren 1995).

Nadia shares:

“My mother is really superstitious. […] In my childhood I was always afraid of the Jumbie bird[7], even if I now know that it is completely irrational.”

Richard continued:

“My mother grew up in Moruga, so even though I grew up in the city, my childhood has memories of the countryside. She grew up in a cacao estate in the south, in the bush. So my childhood was populated by many spirits that were not just the regular ones like the soucouyant[8], etc. It’s through my mother that I feared the Jumbie bird as well! […] Trinidad really transformed in terms of gun violence. As a child I was walking at night. I was going to watch the stars up on a hill with my sister, in the middle of the night. Could you imagine Trinidadian parents now allowing their children to look at the stars in the middle of the night?”

For Richard the perception of the landscape at night transformed with the socio-economic context of the island of Trinidad. The supernatural and magical entities that live in nature since the beginning of Caribbean societies, cohabitate with the problematic and sudden increase of violent crime in the country that occurs more often during night-time. Under these terms, the representation of danger, of the historical folkloric creatures and the contemporary criminality, ironically takes place in the darkness of both urban-places and nature.

How do the artists think of landscaping as an action (instead of an object of gazing) in their artistic practice? For the artists, the landscapes they see and live, take visual shape through the action of looking “back” at the land and looking “out” from the land. What about looking at the land “from within” themselves?

The act of seeing and representing a landscape is based on a negotiation process of “framing” visually. As we saw etymologically, a landscape is a “shaped” land for the viewer, whereas a panoramic view where the spectator can “see everything” (from the ancient Greek “pan-horan”, meaning “all-spectacle”) cannot literally exist. Under the idea to show all the reality that appears, this representation has to be framed by a gaze or a visual machinery in order to be seen, therefore the pan-(all)view is impossible. This fictionalization of the landscape is connected to the roots of the representation of landscape in the Caribbean. Historically the landscape has been depicted through pictorialism, an international aesthetic movement dominated by photography and landscape painting developed between the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries. It emphasizes the beauty of a subject’s matter and its composition, rather than an accurate documentation of reality. The pictorial colonial landscapes represented the lands as a paradisiac “new world” created by European civilization, that responded to their exotic imaginings. Through the illusion of true reality, the composition of landscapes had a functionality. In fact, painted colonial landscapes were locally used as a description of future engineering plans where the government and its investors modified the urban and rural sites, or as storytelling for the motherlands in Europe. The landscape therefore becomes a human construction, a projection of imagination that historically transforms the lands into a kind of dreamscape (Shetler 2007; Delle 2014; Dillman 2015). J.M.W. Turner stated that his landscapes consisted in painting “what he sees, and not what is there”[9]. The landscape is a product of visual interpretation.

These fictional compositions are perpetuated by the modern and contemporary cinematographic representations as well. Here the construction of the landscape responds to a visual scopophilia where the gaze is never neutral, but is formed by a codification of powers (Mitchell 2002, Butler 1992). The Caribbean has historically been the location of a Hollywoodian product of imagination, replacing at times other tropical locations (as was the case for the movie “Gold of the Amazon Women” (1979) for example, where an adventurer allies with blond Caucasian women[10] in the Amazon, while in fact this was shot in Chaguaramas, Trinidad -TT; or alternately, where movies depicting Caribbean locations were actually filmed in California (Fung 1995). These dreamt-lands portrayed by colonial artists and modern movies, have been adopted as national etiquettes of self-exoticism, for touristic and consumeristic purposes (Thompson 2007, Urry 1990), or nationalistic ones (Pinney 1995).

However, through this article we went beyond the limits of visuality, showing that the landscapes are lived spaces where the act of “looking at” is blurred by the experience of “being looked at” at times. For this intended relation, Richard Fung shared his personal experience that “shaped” his way of “shaping the lands” in his video practice.

“My parents had a farm in Santa Cruz[11]. I remember playing in the garden one day, when some tourists in a large American car with a taxi driver were taking photographs of me. From that moment I became very sensitive in a kind of objectifying gaze of the camera of the other. I was made “other” in a landscape that was natural to me. Why would tourists take pictures of me? As I film, in Trinidad or in India or wherever I am, I am aware of that kind of power of the lens that can make “other” the subjects.”

The topic of exoticizing the landscape is at times a danger to perpetuate while using visuality as the artist’s tool of expression and a process of embodiment, where the people who live in an imagined landscape, identify with it. The landscape therefore represents both a world imagined and a world to be lived in (Sim 2011). How do Richard Fung and Nadia Huggins deal with the role of imagination and framing boundaries in their way of land-scaping?

Richard Fung answers:

“Most of my work is non-fiction and experimental. I have great difficulties with how to image the landscape of Trinidad. Because of the way that the Caribbean is seen through the lenses of tourism or through the lenses of disaster in the rest of the world. When I film in Trinidad I ask myself how would I film without that kind of narrow gaze? Even the people who live in Trinidad cannot escape that gaze. When I go there, they tell me that they are living in a paradise and at the same time they are locking their doors due to crime. There is a way in which you are stuck in the dominant way of thinking and experiencing the place. […] The politics of the images, is not only to be considered when they circulate globally, but also locally. What I see in Trinidad is that the wealthy houses have paintings depicting shacks and children outside with a kind of romanticization of poverty and the past, as a kind of past picturesque that they never lived. […] . For this reason, I try to film Trinidad in a way that captures ordinariness, like a shot from a car, where you see a temple, a mosque and a church. Those kinds of things are the ways I think of shooting in Trinidad. The last movie I made about my cousin[12] […] When we both went to Trinidad, I saw her re-inhabiting her own body. Mine as well: I realized that when I return to the accent I grew up with, my face relaxes. And when I drive in Trinidad, where the driver sits on the right, I intuitively know which side of the road I should be on.”

According to Richard’s view, the representation of the landscape is integrated as an imagined vision from its inhabitants. It is seen as a picture, where the landscape was and is, a cultural project that becomes a fictional image to be lived in. The landscape therefore not just implies a process of viewing, but it is a mode of representation and interpretation that imposes a process of identification (Green 1995). However, being aware of this construction of power provided by the visuality and its tools, the artist makes the effort to represent his landscape differently through the ordinary way of presenting the landscape itself.

Nadia adds her perspective on this point:

“I want to conceal the faces of the people I take pictures of. Sometimes they are out of the frame, or something is masking the person. I do that in order to not exoticize the person, describing their essence through the postures, how we inhabit our body in a particular way. Now I try to focus on landscapes without bodies. But people and space work side by side. I’m trying to explore one aspect of it[13] now and in the future I will focus on how to embody the bodies with the landscapes. But this is a question of relation with the people. Especially because the tourist gaze does not have that conversation that I want to create.”

The artists find agency in the action of shooting and framing their landscape. They “shape the lands” they show. This action depends on their embodied experience of the landscape; where the cultural value is placed in visuality. Being the experience of the landscape as the base of their “shaping” system, they can assure respect for the constant evolution of the landscape itself, which changes naturally and culturally in an open-ended process (Wahab 2010). The three kinds of landscapes analyzed here, the natural tropical landscape, the cultural landscape and the waterscape, are in a process of constant “shaping”. Nadia shares her view:

“In the sea you see the moving of the elements, where they regenerate in another place. The ocean cannot be destroyed, it will always take another shape.”

With this last comment our conversation finishes. The primal visual-scape, where the artists see their landscape as an act of “looking back” and of “looking out” are filtered by the experience of “looking within[14] themselves, as a process of embodiment of the landscapes themselves. As soon as the artists assume the ownership of “shaping” their lands through their artistic works, they go beyond the assumption of the landscape as an aesthetic and exotic visual construction perpetuated by the historical picturesque of tropical landscape, assuring its constant “shaping” process.

References:

Richard Fung’s cited works: http://www.richardfung.ca

Nang by Nang (2018)

– Landscapes, installation, McMaster Museum of Art, 2008

Uncomfortable: The Art of Christopher Cozier (2005)

– Islands (2002)

My Mother’s Place (1990)

– “Dear Shani, Hiya Richard… A Dialogue by/with Richard Fung and Shani Mootoo” (1995), Felix, edited by Kathy High, http://www.e-felix.org/issue4/shani.html

Nadia Huggins’ cited works: https://nadiahuggins.com/work

– Bush (2019)

– Disappearing people (2018)

– Transformations (2014-2016)

– Is that a buoy? (2015)

Circa no Future (2014-ongoing)

Benítez-Rojo, Antonio. 1996. The Repeating island. The Caribbean and the Postmodern Perspective. Durham: Duke University

Butler, Judith. 1992. “Mbembe’s Extravagant Power.” Public Culture 5 (1): 67-74.

De Certeau, Michel, The Practice of Everyday Life, Chap 7. University of California Press, Berkeley 1984.

Delle, James. 2014. The Colonial Caribbean. Landscapes of Power in the Plantation System. Cambridge University Press.

Dillman, Jefferson. 2015. Colonizing Paradise. Landscape and Empire in the British West Indies, The University of Alabama Press.

European Landscape convention (2000), Council of Europe Cultural Heritage, Landscape and Spatial Planning Division Directorate of Culture and Cultural and Natural, F-67075 STRASBOURG Cedex France. www.coe.int/EuropeanLandscapeConventionhttps://rm.coe.int/16802f80c6. [Last accessed December 2nd 2020)

Filipucci, P. 2016. “Landscape”. In the Cambridge Encyclopedia of Anthropology (eds) F. Stein, S. Lazar, M. Candea, H. Diemberger, J. Robbins, A. Sanchez & R. Stasch.

Gerber, Jean-David and Hess, Gérald. “From landscape resources to landscape commons focusing on the non-utility values of landscape”, International Journal of the Commons, Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017), pp. 708-732

Glissant, Edouard. 1997. Traité du Tout-Monde: Poétique IV, Paris: Gallimard

—. Philosophie de la relation: poésie en étendue, Paris, Gallimard, 2009.

—. Introduction à une poétique du divers, Paris, Gallimard, 1996.

Gomez-Barris Macarena. 2017. The Extractive Zones, Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives, Durham: Duke University Press.

Green, Nicholas. 1995. “Looking at the landscape: class formation and the visual” in The Anthropology of Landscape, ed. by Hirsh and O’Hanlon, 32-42. Clarendon Press: Oxford.

Hollsten, Laura. “Controlling Nature and Transforming Landscapes in the early modern Caribbean” Global Environment 1 (2008): 80–113.

Humphrey, Caroline. 1995. “Chiefly and Shamanist Landscapes in Mongolia” in The Anthropology of Landscape, ed. by Hirsh and O’Hanlon, 135-162. Clarendon Press: Oxford.

Ingold, Tim. 2000. The Perception of the Environment. Essay on livelihood, dwelling and skill. Routledge : London.

Mitchell, W. J. T. 2002, Landscape and Power, Second Edition, University of Chicago Press.

Pinney, Christopher. 1995. “Moral Topophilia: The Significations of Landscape in Indian Oleographs” in The Anthropology of Landscape, ed. by Hirsh and O’Hanlon, 76-113. Clarendon Press: Oxford.

Shetler, Jan Bender. 2007. Imagining Serengeti: A History of Landscape Memory in Tanzania from Earliest Times to the Present. New African Histories Series. Ohio University Press.

Sim, Jeannie. “Explorations in landscape design theory”, Australian Garden History, Vol. 22, No. 4 (April/May/June 2011), pp. 19-22.

Thompson, Krista. 2007. An eye for the Tropics: Tourism, Photography and Framing the Caribbean, Duke University Press: Durham.

Toren, Christina. 1995. “Seeing the ancestral sites: Transformations in Fijian notion of the land” in The Anthropology of Landscape, ed. by Hirsh and O’Hanlon, 163-183. Clarendon Press: Oxford.

Urry, John. 1990. “The Tourist Gaze.” In the Tourist Gaze. Leisure and Travel in Contemporary Societies, 1-15. Sage: London.

Wahab, Amar. 2010. Colonial inventions: Landscape, power and representation in Nineteenth-century Trinidad. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

[1] My emphasis.

[2] Her work Disappearing people (2018), shows this vison.

[3] Uncomfortable: The Art of Christopher Cozier (2005), documentary.

[4] My emphasis.

[5] My Mother’s Place (1990).

[6] Moruga is a town located in the far south of Trinidad.

[7] The Jumbie bird is a pygmy owl that in folklore is perceived as an omen of death.

[8] The soucouyant is a shapeshifting folkloric figure present in general in the West-Indies represented by an old woman and fire ball who sucks blood.

[9] “Turner, peintures et aquarelles de la Tate, ” Jacquemart-André Museum, Paris, May 2020-January 2021. This quotation was included as part of the wall text appearing between the paintings “Vue imaginaire de l’arsenal” 1840 and “Un paysage idéalisé italien” 1828-1829 implying explicitly that the artist was visually interpreting the locations of his paintings rather than truthfully depicting them.

[10] Detail shared in 2015 from my doctoral fieldwork in Trinidad (TT), PhD thesis “Pretty Mas’: Visuality and Performance in Trinidad and Tobago’s contemporary carnival, West Indies” EHESS, Paris France, 2018.

[11] Santa Cruz is a valley situated in the north of the island.

[12] Nang by Nang-2018.

[13] Her most recent ongoing project: Bush (2019)

[14] My emphasis.

Maica Gugolati, doctor in social and visual anthropology at EHESS( France),worked during her studies with the art residency of Alice Yard, in Trinidad and Tobago (WI), and since then continues to collaborate in the artistic domain. She is a coeditor on written and visual contributions at the Decolonial Dialogues blog research and Festival Culture Research Education journal. In 2019, she curated a research-art virtual exhibition that connects art-anthropology and biology. In October 2020, there will be the launch of an online exhibition at Art Curator Grid platform where she is collaborating with eight artists from the West Indies, Singapore, RDC, Pakistan and the USA. She is as well an artist; Her last project about Caribbean extractive landscapes is showed at ONCA’s art gallery in the UK, 2020.

List of publications of the last two years:

2020- with Jorge E. Ramírez, “Floating Herstories: Sound Project. A

helicalcollaborative process.” in Ethnographic Ear, Ethnologia Polona, edited

by Piotr Cichocki. Vol 39 (2018), pp. 51-69.

2020- Decolonial Dialogues research blog: “Decolonize Plans. A Flesh Call.”

Autoethnography case

https://decolonialdialogue.wordpress.com/2020/05/27/to-decolonize-plansaflesh-

call/

2020- Curatorial Practice and correlated articles: AllegraLab, Virtual Museum, “On the

Fluid Mosaic, transdisciplinary project between art, anthropology and biology.”

2020- [Pending Publication] “I play myself. Some of its plural meanings in carnival,

Trinidad and Tobago (WI)” Kingston: Ian Randle Publishers.

2020- [Pending Publication] “ ‘Today is not massa day come back, but massa day gone

black!’ Class and colorism controversies in contemporary carnival performance,

Trinidad and Tobago, WI.” Edited by Philip Scher, In Caribbean and Caribbean

Diaspora, London: Routledge Worlds.

2020- “Trasïte.” Of(f) the archive edizioni. Ed. by Tatsuo inagaki, Francesco Marano

et al. Art-Anthropology Installation, Catalogue of the Anthropology/Art

exhibition Chiaromonte 2017, University of Basilicata, Italy. ISBN

9788894466126

2019- with Cécile Vermot, “Parody, satire and the rise of populism under postcolonial

criticism: an Italian and a French case”. Edited by Adrián Scribano,

Maximiliano E. Korstanje, Freddy Alex Timmermann López. In Populism and

Postcolonialism, 31-47. London: Routledge.

2018- “Creation of an exportable culture: a cosmopolitan West Indian case” In Honor

of Stuart Hall African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal DOI:

10.1080/17528631.2018.1451597 April 2018.

2018- “La Djablesse: Between Martinique, Trinidad (and Tobago), and its Pan-

Caribbean Dimension” Women, Gender, and Families of Color, Illinois Press

University, Volume 6, Number 2, Fall 2018.

La construction du paysagisme avec Nadia Huggins et Richard Fung

Cet article a pour but d’enquêter sur la valeur subjective et culturelle des paysages au-delà de leurs représentations en soi, dans le cadre d’un échange entre les artistes caribéen.ne.s Nadia Huggins et Richard Fung.

Nadia Huggins est née à Trinidad (Trinité-et-Tobago) et a grandi à Saint-Vincent. C’est une photographe et artiste visuelle qui travaille sur les paysages sous-marins et terrestres. Ses œuvres Transformations (2014-2016) et Is that a buoy? (2015) interrogent les modalités de la performativité et de la représentation du genre de et dans les paysages. Richard Fung, originaire de Triniad (Trinité-et-Tobago) et du Canada, est réalisateur de films expérimentaux et artiste visuel. Il a travaillé de façon explicite sur le sujet du paysage dans son installation Landscapes exposée à la McMaster University Museum of Art en 2008, où il a transformé le paysage pastoral de J. M. W. Turner par des superpositions de vidéos questionnant les relations entre la copie et l’original ainsi qu’entre les terres des Premières Nations et la représentation coloniale de ces territoires. Parmi ses vidéos-documentaires, Island (2002) analyse la relation entre le paysage caribéen et l’image cinématographique.

Cet article est l’élaboration d’une discussion menée entre nous trois sur les valeurs socio-critiques et les souvenirs sous-jacents derrière les représentations par les artistes de leurs paysages tropicaux. Lorsque j’ai rencontré les artistes, mon but était de comprendre quels éléments invisibles existent au-delà de la visualité des paysages eux-mêmes. En partant de l’étymologie du mot landscape (paysage), j’ai demandé aux artistes de s’étendre sur leurs expériences d’avoir été « façonné.e.s » par la terre et comment eux.elles-mêmes la « façonnent » à leur tour artistiquement, sachant que landscape vient du néerlandais ancien scape, qui veut dire « façonner la terre ». Dans cette conversation, je leur ai demandé de traverser et transcender la visualité des paysages en eux-mêmes, de partager leurs origines culturelles, leurs souvenirs ainsi que leurs liens affectifs avec les paysages qui enveloppent leurs vies.

Landscape revient étymologiquement à l’acte de façonner la terre à travers une action visuelle. Le paysage est donc par définition lié à un scape visuel créé par l’artiste à travers le médium photographique et cinématographique. Pourtant, le paysage n’implique pas seulement un espace modifié par l’injonction visuelle (Gómez-Barris, 2017) ; il façonne de fait les modes de vie de ses habitant.e.s (Filipucci, 2016) et il canalise la création d’identités sociales et subjectives (Mitchell, 2002). Ainsi, un paysage est à la fois un espace pratiqué (Certeau, 1984), partagé (Ingold, 2000), relationnel (Glissant, 1997) et culturel (Sim, 2011).

Le plaisir scopophile du paysage est inversé dans cette conversation. D’abord, on analyse le paysage en tant qu’espace pratiqué et comme espace relationnel. Nous ne discutons du paysage en tant que scape visuel qu’à la fin de ce texte. En guise de conclusion : cet article se propose de découvrir où le paysage « touche » la vie des artistes, leurs expériences et regards de façon haptique, traduite visuellement dans leurs productions artistiques par la suite.

« Land-scaping »

D’après la Convention européenne du paysage (2000 : 9), le paysage est un espace, tel qu’il est perçu par les gens, dont les caractéristiques émanent d’un jeu d’actions et d’interactions entre l’être humain et la nature. En amont de notre échange, j’ai formulé la demande aux artistes de partager quelques images de leur passé, afin de montrer le paysage de « leur » lien avec la Caraïbe ainsi que les relations socio-affectives et sensorielles qui en découlent. Par cette demande, j’entendais comprendre comment le paysage, en tant qu’espace pratiqué, devient un outil mnémonique qui évoque des « souvenirs vivants » (Shelter, 2007). Le but de cette discussion est de découvrir des espaces relationnels (Glissant, 2009) offerts par les paysages dès lors que ceux-ci sont perçus comme des lieux vécus.

Les deux artistes ont envoyé des photos d’enfance à la plage. Richard Fung a présenté une photo de la plage Maracas, située au nord de l’île de Trinidad, dans les années 1960 (Photo 1). Nadia Huggins a partagé sa photo de famille (Photo 2) ainsi que son portrait d’enfant dans les eaux d’Indian Bay à Saint-Vincent (Photo 3). Cette baie reste le lieu de référence de sa photographie sous-marine.

Photo extraite de l’album de famille de Richard Fung, plage Maracas, Trinté, Trinité-et-Tobago, années 1960.

Nadia Huggins, en compagnie de sa mère et sa sœur, années 1980.

Portrait de Nadia Huggins à Indian Bay, Saint-Vincent, années 1980.

Suite à ce premier partage de photos, il était évident que la notion de landscape, avec son emphase littérale sur land (la terre), s’accompagnait pour tou.te.s deux de la présence de l’eau. Étymologiquement, le mot anglais island (île), ou encore is-land et en anglais ancien īegland, signifie « terre aqueuse ». Selon leur étymologie, les paysages insulaires naturels et nationaux des deux artistes sont littéralement des terres délimitées ou « façonnées » par l’eau. Dans leurs photos, le paysage marin dans leur paysages vécus s’intègre à la notion de paysage. En concordance avec la pensée archipélagique (Glissant, 1996) cela nous permet de penser la Caraïbe à travers sa pluralité et diversité, mais également de la considérer dans sa polyphonie relationnelle contre-ponctuelle (Benítez-Rojo, 1996). La vision des artistes, leurs souvenirs et façons de percevoir leur paysage tropical, sont tour à tour similaires et différents.

L’acte visuel formant la sensibilité affective suscitée par chaque paysage prend, quant à lui, des sens différents pour chacun.e. Pour Nadia Huggins, il est décrit comme un « regard en arrière » sur la terre, tandis que pour Richard Fung il revient à « regarder vers l’extérieur depuis la terre ». Nadia Huggins dit :

« Je pense que mes souvenirs les plus forts du paysage en grandissant revenaient toujours à être dans la mer et regarder en arrière , vers l’île, pour l’apprécier dans sa grandeur, comme s’il s’agissait d’une montagne. Pour moi, cette visualité-là est celle qui entraîne vraiment la prise de conscience du fait que l’on se trouve sur une île. Se trouver physiquement sur la terre ferme et regarder la mer n’est pas suffisant pour sentir que l’on est sur une île. C’est plutôt lorsqu’on tourne la tête vers l’île que l’on comprend qu’on est dans un espace limité. […] C’est en partie pourquoi la plupart de mon travail prend une perspective depuis l’eau. Elle transmet toujours cette idée de regarder en arrière vers la terre, de voir les gens sur la plage . L’on acquiert cette impression d’hyper-conscience, qui révèle à quel point cet espace est particulièrement petit. »

Richard Fung :

« Les images que j’ai envoyées [Photo1] ont été prises à la fin des années 1960. J’ai surpris un homme, qui je présume était un surfeur, dans une sorte d’acte d’hétéro-masculinité. Le surfeur, une figure qui n’était pas encore habituelle dans les années 1960, pose la question de la classe et de la race. Lorsque j’ai fait un film avec Christopher Cozier en 2005, il a parlé de la plage en disant que, sur une île, on regarde toujours ”vers l’extérieur ”, ce qui est vrai pour moi. »

Nadia Huggins et Richard Fung décrivent plusieurs sensations dans le vécu de leurs paysages tropicaux respectifs. Pour Nadia, c’est en regardant la terre depuis la mer qu’elle ressent ce sentiment d’appartenir à un lieu petit, tel que Saint-Vincent, en comparaison avec Trinidad. Pour Richard, en revanche, la terre exerce une force contraire : il regarde la mer depuis la terre, dans une dynamique d’évasion.

Cette reconnaissance leur permet d’entretenir des relations différentes vis-à-vis de leurs paysages. Pour Nadia, son paysage se caractérise par le sentiment d’une force imposée de la nature, causée par la présence du volcan qui structurait son île, la possibilité imminente d’une éruption et le fait que Saint-Vincent est souvent proie aux saisons d’ouragans, pendant lesquelles les conditions météorologiques impactent et façonnent les habitants de l’île. Nadia :

« Même si le volcan est inactif depuis 1979, on s’accorde en general sur le fait qu’à n’importe quel moment, il peut faire éruption. Je suis toujours consciente que quelque chose peut arriver, n’importe quand. Il y a toujours ce sentiment de la vie qui change par le fait des catastrophes naturelles, lesquelles peuvent complètement changer le paysage. Il y a donc une partie de moi qui ressent une responsabilité de documenter les choses. Cette conscience est toujours présente. Juste de regarder ce qui se passe avec le temps qu’il fait. Pour moi, l’impression que ma personne, tout autant que l’île elle-même, peuvent être détruites par un phénomène sur lequel on n’a aucun contrôle, est toujours présente. »

Cependant, Richard évoque ses relations entre le paysage suburbain de la capitale de Trinidad et l’expérience du paysage naturel hérité de ses parents. Dans son discours, il existe une reconnaissance du sentiment d’une expérience liminale du paysage. Il dit :

« J’ai grandi en plein dans la classe moyenne, mais mes parents étaient tou.te.s deux d’origine pauvre et rurale. […] Quand j’ai fait un film sur ma mère , nous sommes retourné.e.s à Moruga et elle a commencé à nommer toutes les plantes en énumérant leurs propriétés curatives, que je ne connaissais pas ayant grandi en ville. Mon enfance était suburbaine, et non pas urbaine. Donc ma propre orientation au paysage partait de l’orientation suburbaine, pourtant toujours à la merci de la nature. Les rues s’inondaient, et quand on était enfant, on jouait avec des bâtons de crème glacée pour en faire des petits bateaux dans un canal. […] Tu sais, ici [à Toronto, au Canada] l’eau drainée disparaît lorsqu’elle touche le sol. Même quand il pleut, on reste inconscient de l’impact de la nature. »

La plage pour lui, en tant que Trindidadien né dans un environnement urbain du nord du pays, était aux antipodes du lieu où il avait passé sa vie :

« Pendant l’essentiel de ma vie, j’ai été circonscrit par les collines qui entouraient la vallée de St. Ann’s, où se trouvait notre maison. J’ai grandi avec la relation visuelle que j’avais vis-à-vis de ce paysage-là, d’où on peut voir les collines. […] Il y avait un hôtel qui se nommait Belvédère, bel-vedere, qui appartenait à un étranger. C’était un des rares hôtels avec une vue sur Port d’Espagne. »

Fung fait allusion à la relation avec ces paysages regardés, du fait de la juvénile impossibilité de se mouvoir, et de ses observations dans le nord de l’île :

« Comme tu sais, la pluie bouge à Trinité. On peut voir la pluie venir d’entre les collines depuis le nord-est. Si on était en train de rendre visite à un.e voisin.e, quelqu’un criait : ”La pluie arrive !” et on devait rentrer à la maison en courant, fermer les fenêtres et sortir les pots pour les fuites d’eau, car la pluie entrait à travers le toit. Mon paysage était délimité par ces murs géologiques de la vallée. Donc être à Maracas Beach et regarder vers la mer représentait en fait une évasion pour moi, très différente de celles que j’ai connu dans le reste de ma vie. Au contraire de ce que pensent la plupart des gens lorsqu’on vient d’une île tropicale, assumant qu’on est presque toujours à la plage, dans la partie urbaine de Trinidad on ne dispose pas d’un accès facile aux plages ; cela nécessite un trajet considérable pour y aller. »

Néanmoins, pour notre échange, il a décidé de citer trois plages en tant que paysages vécus : Maracas Beach (Photo 1), Chacachacare Beach (près de l’ancienne colonie de lépreux.euses de l’île éponyme, proche du Vénézuela) et Macqueripe, une plage de la marine étasunienne située au nord de l’île. Le paysage procure à Richard des « sensations corporelles » de façon directe. Il regarde la Photo 1 :

« À l’époque, les douches n’avaient pas encore été construites à Maracas. Ce sentiment d’aller à la plage ainsi que le rituel pour y arriver, en traversant la forêt en partie, a toujours été palpitant pour moi. […] La sensation que tu avais immédiatement était celle d’une peau collante, du fait du sel marin. Tu devais t’asseoir sur ta serviette, pour ne pas salir le siège de la voiture, même si celui-ci était probablement recouvert de film plastique. Il y avait cette idée de laver la voiture dès le retour à la maison, et cette obsession de ne pas garer la voiture trop près de la mer, pour éviter qu’elle rouille. »

Représenter « l’appartenance à un lieu » pose la question de la dimension humaine et non-humaine (Pinney, 1995). Pour Richard en particulier, Maracas Beach devient un espace performatif où le genre, la classe et la race sont représentés et affirmés. Il a décrit Maracas Beach comme le lieu à la mode, tandis que, dans les parages, Tyrico Beach était surtout fréquentée par des Trinidadien.ne.s d’origine indienne. Au fil de notre discussion, la notion de classe apparaît dans les paysages qu’il.elle.s fréquentaient. Celle-ci est performée sur la surface du paysage marin, ainsi que sur terre où la visibilité est mise en jeu. Renouant avec sa mémoire, Richard évoque Macqueripe Beach :

« Macqueripe faisait encore partie de la base militaire américaine. Du coup, mes parents avaient pris une autorisation d’y acceder liée à leurs aspirations de classe, et nous étions admis.e.s dans un autre paysage. Tu sais, la culture du paysage était très intéressante. Dès que tu traversais ce point de contrôle, la terre prenait un air différent. Elle était très maquillée, l’architecture était différente et les maisons étaient équipées de moustiquaires, quelque chose que les Trinidadien.ne.s n’ont pas, même aujourd’hui. »

Nadia continue à décrire son paysage vécu, Indian Bay, fréquentée par la population locale de Saint-Vincent. Elle dit :

« Il y a un mélange étrange de sable blanc et noir, et le lieu est facilement accessible […] donc beaucoup de gens viennent de l’arrière-pays. Elle est connue comme une plage locale. Voilà mon expérience d’aller à la plage est de me sentir partie intégrante de la communauté. Je viens également d’une famille de classe moyenne et ouvrière, et mes parents ont trouvé un moyen de s’arranger avec ces différences, tout en comprenant que le fait que j’aille à cette plage en particulier était important dans le sens où je comprenais comment les gens sur l’île pensent et fonctionnent. On m’encourageait à le faire depuis que j’étais petite. »

Ses expériences d’enfance dans cette plage créent une familiarité avec les sujets de ses projets de photographie contemporaine où de jeunes baigneur.euse.s interagissent avec l’eau, prenant pour exemple les photos de son projet Circa No Future :

« […] parce que c’était aussi mon expérience en grandissant. Il y a une partie de moi qui souhaite renouer avec ces moments de ma jeunesse. Des moments où je me sentais comme une jeune garçon noir dans ce sens […] Je traînais avec ces jeunes, on plongeait dans l’eau depuis les rochers. J’étais la seule fille dans le groupe qui faisait ce qu’ils faisaient […] Au fil du temps, j’ai reconnu que mon corps et ma couleur de peau étaient différents. Donc il y a en moi une envie d’explorer ça. »

Richard Fung and his family in Macqueripe Beach, TT, 1960s.

Nadia Huggins and her cousin, Indian Bay, Saint Vincent, 1990s.

Contrairement à Richard, Nadia établit un lien entre le paysage et la plage en considérant ceux-ci comme des espaces genrés.

« À Saint-Vincent la plage est davantage un espace genré. Il y a plus de garçons qui nagent que de filles, ce qui s’explique peut-être par une tendance familiale. Les garçons ont une sorte de rite de passage vers l’âge adulte avec l’eau, que les filles n’ont pas. Les filles sont moins enclines à faire de la sorte, probablement à cause de leurs cheveux. »

Nadia fait ici indirectement allusion à son œuvre introspective, causée par une maladie auto-immune qui lui a fait perdre ses cheveux. À cause de (ou grâce à) l’absence de long cheveux, apanage des stéréotypes féminins les plus superficiels, elle queerise sa représentation de genre lorsqu’elle est dans l’eau, et a la possibilité de mener une recherche visuelle des performances genrées de la masculinité des garçons de la plage, sans être perçue comme une femme à première vue. À en croire notre échange, la surface de la mer crée une sorte de filtre qui, d’après les deux artistes, désagrège la construction performative du genre.

Richard :

« C’est agréable de voir ce genre de contrepoint, où ici [sur la Photo 1] le surfeur incarne et présente sa masculinité, tandis que dans les œuvres de Nadia, l’eau dissout le genre quand elle s’y plonge. […] Je fais de la plongée avec un tuba depuis que je suis petit, et le monde s’ouvre à toi quand tu vas sous la surface. La sensation de l’eau est comme un espace transcendant. J’ai l’impression de sentir les photos de Nadia. »

Nadia répond :

« Les gens performent lorsqu’ils.elles sont vu.e.s. Quand tu vas sous l’eau, tu perds cette conscience. Sans la construction de qui tu es censé être quand tu es sur la terre ferme, tu retournes à un sens primal de l’identité. Parce que le corps humain n’est pas fait pour vivre sous l’eau, il est très difficile de performer quand il s’agit de survivre. C’est là précisément que le genre se dissout à mon avis. »

L’expérience d’être submergé dans le paysage marin suspend les performances de classe et de genre. L’impression sensorielle de ne pas être seulement entouré.e d’eau, mais également d’être « touché.e » par l’eau, fait que l’être humain s’incorpore dans le paysage marin dans son intégralité. Dès que l’on traverse la surface de l’eau, celle-ci devient un outil liminal qui, selon Nadia, opère de façon similaire à l’action de se masquer au carnaval, le paysage subissant une humanisation tandis que l’humain.e est naturalisé.e. Nadia poursuit sa réflexion :

« On peut le comparer à un carnaval. On se déguise pour cacher son identité, en permettant qu’un certain type de performance se produise. On utilise le paysage de la même façon. On peut performer les actes qu’on désire profondément. […] La mer pour moi est une sorte d’espace démocratique dans lequel toutes les constructions qui valent sur terre sont dissoutes. Quand tu es sous l’eau, tu es sous l’horizon, dans un processus de transformation de soi avec la nature. »

Nadia évoque la possibilité d’être dénué.e de classe et de genre lorsqu’on se submerge dans l’eau. A contrario, la terre ferme s’apparente à une « zone de contacts » et de transformations qui implique la valeur économique de la terre, laquelle devient dès lors une propriété, la terre comme droit et privation, comme sens de possession et de transgression, tous dérivés de la valeur de plantation des domaines fonciers (Gerber Hess, 2017 ; Hollsten, 2008). Dans la région caribéenne, les terres étaient des « champs » de contention de rapports de force, qui englobaient des séparatismes raciaux, ethniques, religieux et de genre. Les terres sont ici objectivées par l’être humain. Néanmoins, les deux artistes s’intéressent au processus d’apprentissage qui se fait à partir du paysage, décrivant celui-ci comme une « pédagogie de la terre ». Richard continue :

« Tu as tout à fait raison, Nadia ! Quand j’étais enfant à Trinidad, j’étais tellement conscient de la lumière et du soleil ! Je me réveillais peu avant le lever du soleil, et je pouvais voir cette lumière si particulière se filtrer à travers les feuilles. Dans une grande ville comme Toronto on n’oublie pas cela, car il y a de la lumière partout, tout le temps. »

La lumière est un élément important pour Nadia également, car elle est liée à ce moment de la journée dans lequel elle prend ses photographies. J’ai posé une question sur la valeur culturelle de l’obscurité vis-à-vis de ces paysages. Les deux artistes se sont référé.e.s à leur enfance et à la dimension surnaturelle qui s’inscrit dans le paysage sombre. Il y a une relation interactive (Humphrey, 1995) entre les terres, l’eau et l’observateur.trice. Les terres sont habitées par des êtres ancestraux (Shelter, 2007) et le paysage symbolise une coprésence du temps, où le passé et le présent communiquent en permanence (Toren, 1995).

Nadia se remémore :

« Ma mère est très superstitieuse. […] Dans mon enfance, j’avais toujours peur de l’oiseau Jumbie , même si je sais à présent que c’est complètement irrationnel. »

Richard continue :

« Ma mère a grandi à Moruga, donc même si j’ai grandi en ville, mon enfance recèle des souvenirs de la campagne. Elle a grandi dans un domaine de cacao du sud, dans la brousse. Donc mon enfance était peuplée de nombreux esprits qui n’étaient pas seulement les plus connus comme le soucouyant , etc. C’est par ma mère que j’ai appris à craindre l’oiseau Jumbie aussi ! […] Trinidad a subi une véritable transformation en termes de violences liées aux armes à feu. Je sortais souvent voir les étoiles avec ma sœur sur une colline, en pleine nuit. Tu peux imaginer des parents trinidadien.ne.s laissant leurs enfants aller voir les étoiles la nuit, maintenant ? »

Pour Richard, la perception du paysage nocturne s’est transformée avec le contexte socio-économique de l’île de Trinidad. Les êtres surnaturels et magiques qui habitent la nature depuis la naissance des sociétés caribéennes coexistent avec la soudaine et problématique montée des crimes violents dans le pays, lesquels ont lieu surtout à la tombée de la nuit. Dans ces termes, la représentation du danger, inspirée autant par les créatures folkloriques historiques que par la criminalité contemporaine, a lieu ironiquement dans l’obscurité, que ce soit dans les espaces urbains ou naturels.

Comment les artistes conçoivent-il.elle.s la construction du paysage comme une action (au lieu d’un objet d’observation) dans leur pratique artistique ? Pour les artistes, les paysages qu’elle.il.s voient et habitent prennent forme visuellement dans l’action de regarder « en arrière » vers la terre et de regarder « en dehors » depuis celle-ci. Qu’en est-il de regarder la terre « au-dedans » d’eux.elles-mêmes ?

L’acte de voir et de représenter un paysage se fonde sur le processus de négociation de l’« encadrement » visuel. Comme on l’a vu étymologiquement, un paysage est une terre « façonnée » pour l’observateur.trice, tandis qu’une vue panoramique où le spectateur peut « tout voir » (du grec ancien pan-horam, ce qui veut dire « tout-spectacle ») ne peut exister littéralement. Dans l’idée de montrer toute la réalité telle que celle-ci apparaît, cette représentation doit être encadrée par un regard ou une machination visuelle pour être vue; ainsi, la vue pan(tout)oramique est impossible. La fictionnalisation du paysage est liée aux racines de la représentation du paysage dans la Caraïbe. Historiquement, le paysage a été dépeint par le pictorialisme, un mouvement esthétique international dominé par la photographie et la peinture de paysage qui s’est développé entre les XIXe et XXe siècles. Il faisait emphase sur la beauté de la matière d’un sujet et de sa composition, plutôt que sur une documentation juste de la réalité. Les paysages picturaux de l’ère coloniale représentaient les terres comme un « nouveau monde » paradisiaque créé par la civilisation européenne, qui s’accommodaient à leurs imaginaires exotiques. À travers l’illusion de la véritable réalité, la composition des paysages avait une fonction. D’ailleurs, les paysages coloniaux tels qu’ils étaient peints étaient utilisés localement comme une description de futurs projets d’ingénierie dans lesquels le gouvernement et ses investisseurs modifiaient les sites urbains et ruraux, ou comme une façon de raconter un récit pour les métropoles en Europe. Le paysage devient alors une construction humaine, une projection de l’imagination qui transforme historiquement les terres en un paysage onirique (Shetler, 2007 ; Delle, 2014 ; Dillman, 2015). J. M. W. Turner a déclaré que ses paysages consistaient en peindre « ce qu’il voit, et non pas de ce qui y est » . Le paysage est un produit de l’interprétation visuelle.

Ces compositions fictionnelles sont perpétuées par les représentations cinématographiques modernes et contemporaines également. Ici, la construction du paysage répond à une scopophilie visuelle où le regard n’est jamais neutre, mais formé par une codification de pouvoirs (Mitchell, 2002 ; Butler, 1992). La Caraïbe a été, historiquement, l’emplacement d’un produit de l’imagination hollywoodienne, remplaçant parfois d’autres destinations tropicales (il en est ainsi pour le film L’or des amazones sorti en 1979 par exemple, où un aventurier rallie des femmes blondes et caucasiennes dans l’Amazonie, alors que le lieu de tournage était en réalité Chaguaramas, à Trinidad ; ou, d’autre part, des films prenant des destinations caribéennes pour décor, mais dont le tournage a été réalisé en Californie (Fung, 1995). Ces terres rêvées dépeintes par des artistes coloniaux et des long-métrages modernes ont été adoptées comme des étiquettes nationales d’auto-exotisation, au bénéfice d’intérêts touristiques et consuméristes (Thompson, 2007 ; Urry, 1990), ou bien nationalistes (Pinney, 1995).

Cependant, nous nous sommes aventuré.e.s dans cet article au-delà des limites de la visualité pour montrer que les paysages sont des espaces vécus où l’acte de « regarder » est floué par l’expérience d’« être regardé » par moments. En ce qui concerne cette relation délibérée, Richard Fung a partagé son expérience personnelle, laquelle a « façonné » sa manière de « façonner les terres » à son tour dans sa pratique de vidéaste.

« Mes parents avaient une ferme à Santa Cruz . Je me rappelle d’un jour où je jouais dans le jardin, lorsque des touristes sont passé.e.s dans une grande voiture américaine conduite par un chauffeur de taxi, et m’ont pris en photo. À partir de ce moment-là, je suis devenu très sensible vis-à-vis du regard objectivant de l’appareil d’autrui. On faisait de moi un ”autre” dans un paysage qui m’était naturel. Pourquoi des touristes me prendraient-il.elle.s en photo ? Lorsque je filme, à Trinidad ou en Inde ou où que je sois, je suis conscient de cette sorte de pouvoir de l’objectif qui peut faire des sujets des ”autres”. »

Le sujet de l’exotisation du paysage est parfois un danger qui se perpétue en utilisant la visualité en tant qu’outil d’expression de l’artiste et un processus d’incarnation, dans lequel les personnes qui vivent dans un paysage imaginaire se reconnaissent en celui-ci. Le paysage représente alors autant un monde imaginé qu’un monde à vivre (Sim, 2011). Comment Richard Fung et Nadia Huggins entendent-il.elle.s le rôle de l’imagination et les limites de l’encadrement dans leur façon de concevoir le paysage ?

Richard Fung nous répond :

« L’essentiel de mon travail est documentaire et expérimental. J’éprouve de grandes difficultés à imager le paysage de Trinidad. À cause de la façon dont la Caraïbe est vue par le prisme du tourisme ou celui de la catastrophe naturelle dans le reste du monde. Quand je tourne à Trinidad je me demande, comment je filmerais sans ce type de regard étroit ? Même les gens qui habitent à Trinidad ne peuvent pas échapper à ce regard. Quand je m’y rends, il.elle.s me disent qu’il.elle.s vivent dans un paradis tout en tirant le verrou chez eux.elles à cause de la criminalité. Il y a une idée d’enfermement dans le mode dominant de penser et vivre le lieu. […] La politique des images ne doit pas être uniquement considérée quand celles-ci circulent dans le monde, mais aussi localement. Ce que je vois à Trinidad, c’est que les maisons nanties sont ornées de tableaux montrant des huttes et des enfants montrant une sorte de vision romancée de la pauvreté et du passé, s’agissant d’un passé pittoresque qu’il.elle.s n’ont jamais vécu. […] Pour cette raison, j’essaye de filmer Trinidad de façon à capturer l’ordinaire, comme un plan tourné en voiture, où on voit un temple, une mosquée et une église. C’est le genre de choses auxquelles je pense quand je tourne à Trinidad. [Dans] le dernier film que j’ai fait sur ma cousine […], nous sommes allé.e.s à Trinidad tou.te.s les deux, et je l’ai vue habiter une nouvelle fois son propre corps. Le mien aussi : je me suis rendu compte que quand je reprends l’accent avec lequel j’ai grandi, mon visage se détend. Et quand je conduis à Trinidad, quand le chauffeur s’assoit à droite, je sais intuitivement de quel côté de la route je dois m’installer. »

D’après le point de vue de Richard, la représentation du paysage s’intègre comme une vision imaginée de ses habitant.e.s. Elle est vue comme une photographie, où le paysage était et est un projet culturel qui devient une image fictive vécue. Le paysage n’implique donc pas seulement un processus d’observation, mais également un mode de représentation et d’interprétation qui impose un processus d’identification (Green, 1995). Aussi, tout en étant conscient de cette construction de pouvoir façonnée par la visualité et les outils qui en émanent, l’artiste fait l’effort de représenter son paysage différemment en se prévalant de la manière ordinaire de présenter le paysage en lui-même.

Nadia ajoute sa perspective sur ce point :

« Je souhaite cacher les visages des personnes que je prends en photo. Parfois elles se trouvent hors champ, ou quelque chose masque la personne. Je le fais de façon à éviter d’exotiser la personne, à décrire son essence à travers ses postures, comment nous habitons nos corps de façon particulière. Maintenant, je tente de me concentrer sur les paysages sans corps. Toutefois, les gens et les espaces fonctionnent côte à côte. J’essaye d’explorer un aspect de cela en ce moment, et dans l’avenir je me concentrerai sur comment incarner les corps avec les paysages. Mais c’est là une question de relation avec les gens. En particulier parce que le regard du.de la touriste n’intègre pas cette conversation que je veux créer. »

Les artistes trouvent une manne dans l’acte de filmer et d’encadrer leur paysage. Il.elle.s « façonnent les terres » qu’il.elle.s montrent. Cette action dépend de leur expérience incarnée du paysage ; où la valeur culturelle se nourrit de la visualité. L’expérience du paysage étant la base de leur système de « façonnement », il.elle.s peuvent s’assurer que l’évolution constante du paysage en soi est respectée, un paysage qui change naturellement et culturellement dans un processus ouvert (Wahab, 2010). Les trois types de paysage analysés ici (le paysage naturel tropical, le paysage culturel et le paysage marin) s’inscrivent dans un flux de « façonnement » constant. Nadia partage ses vues :

« Dans la mer, on voit le mouvement des éléments, où ils se régénèrent dans un autre lieu. L’océan ne peut être détruit, il prendra toujours une autre forme. »

Notre échange s’achève avec ce dernier commentaire. Le paysage visuel primal, où les artistes voient leur paysage comme un acte de « regarder en arrière » et de « regarder en dehors », est filtré par l’expérience de « regarder au-dedans » de leur for intérieur, en un processus d’incarnation des paysages eux-mêmes. Dès que les artistes assument leur droit sur le « façonnement » de leurs terres à travers leur travail artistique, il.elle.s vont au-delà de la compréhension du paysage comme une construction visuelle esthétique et exotique perpétuée par le pittoresque historique du paysage tropical, garantissant comme cela son processus de « façonnement » constant.

References:

Richard Fung’s cited works: http://www.richardfung.ca

– Nang by Nang (2018)

– Landscapes, installation, McMaster Museum of Art, 2008

– Uncomfortable: The Art of Christopher Cozier (2005)

– Islands (2002)

– My Mother’s Place (1990)

– “Dear Shani, Hiya Richard… A Dialogue by/with Richard Fung and Shani Mootoo” (1995), Felix, edited by Kathy High, http://www.e-felix.org/issue4/shani.html

Nadia Huggins’ cited works: https://nadiahuggins.com/work

– Bush (2019)

– Disappearing people (2018)

– Transformations (2014-2016)

– Is that a buoy? (2015)

– Circa no Future (2014-ongoing)

Benítez-Rojo, Antonio. 1996. The Repeating island. The Caribbean and the Postmodern Perspective. Durham: Duke University

Butler, Judith. 1992. “Mbembe’s Extravagant Power.” Public Culture 5 (1): 67-74.

De Certeau, Michel, The Practice of Everyday Life, Chap 7. University of California Press, Berkeley 1984.

Delle, James. 2014. The Colonial Caribbean. Landscapes of Power in the Plantation System. Cambridge University Press.

Dillman, Jefferson. 2015. Colonizing Paradise. Landscape and Empire in the British West Indies, The University of Alabama Press.

European Landscape convention (2000), Council of Europe Cultural Heritage, Landscape and Spatial Planning Division Directorate of Culture and Cultural and Natural, F-67075 STRASBOURG Cedex France. www.coe.int/EuropeanLandscapeConventionhttps://rm.coe.int/16802f80c6. [Last accessed December 2nd 2020)

Filipucci, P. 2016. “Landscape”. In the Cambridge Encyclopedia of Anthropology (eds) F. Stein, S. Lazar, M. Candea, H. Diemberger, J. Robbins, A. Sanchez & R. Stasch.

Gerber, Jean-David and Hess, Gérald. “From landscape resources to landscape commons focusing on the non-utility values of landscape”, International Journal of the Commons, Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017), pp. 708-732

Glissant, Edouard. 1997. Traité du Tout-Monde: Poétique IV, Paris: Gallimard

—. Philosophie de la relation: poésie en étendue, Paris, Gallimard, 2009.

—. Introduction à une poétique du divers, Paris, Gallimard, 1996.

Gomez-Barris Macarena. 2017. The Extractive Zones, Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives, Durham: Duke University Press.

Green, Nicholas. 1995. “Looking at the landscape: class formation and the visual” in The Anthropology of Landscape, ed. by Hirsh and O’Hanlon, 32-42. Clarendon Press: Oxford.

Hollsten, Laura. “Controlling Nature and Transforming Landscapes in the early modern Caribbean” Global Environment 1 (2008): 80–113.

Humphrey, Caroline. 1995. “Chiefly and Shamanist Landscapes in Mongolia” in The Anthropology of Landscape, ed. by Hirsh and O’Hanlon, 135-162. Clarendon Press: Oxford.

Ingold, Tim. 2000. The Perception of the Environment. Essay on livelihood, dwelling and skill. Routledge : London.

Mitchell, W. J. T. 2002, Landscape and Power, Second Edition, University of Chicago Press.

Pinney, Christopher. 1995. “Moral Topophilia: The Significations of Landscape in Indian Oleographs” in The Anthropology of Landscape, ed. by Hirsh and O’Hanlon, 76-113. Clarendon Press: Oxford.

Shetler, Jan Bender. 2007. Imagining Serengeti: A History of Landscape Memory in Tanzania from Earliest Times to the Present. New African Histories Series. Ohio University Press.

Sim, Jeannie. “Explorations in landscape design theory”, Australian Garden History, Vol. 22, No. 4 (April/May/June 2011), pp. 19-22.

Thompson, Krista. 2007. An eye for the Tropics: Tourism, Photography and Framing the Caribbean, Duke University Press: Durham.

Toren, Christina. 1995. “Seeing the ancestral sites: Transformations in Fijian notion of the land” in The Anthropology of Landscape, ed. by Hirsh and O’Hanlon, 163-183. Clarendon Press: Oxford.

Urry, John. 1990. “The Tourist Gaze.” In the Tourist Gaze. Leisure and Travel in Contemporary Societies, 1-15. Sage: London.

Wahab, Amar. 2010. Colonial inventions: Landscape, power and representation in Nineteenth-century Trinidad. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

1] My emphasis.

[2] Her work Disappearing people (2018), shows this vison.

[3] Uncomfortable: The Art of Christopher Cozier (2005), documentary.

[4] My emphasis.

[5] My Mother’s Place (1990).

[6] Moruga is a town located in the far south of Trinidad.

[7] The Jumbie bird is a pygmy owl that in folklore is perceived as an omen of death. Une “chevêchette” en français

[8] The soucouyant is a shapeshifting folkloric figure present in general in the West-Indies represented by an old woman and fire ball who sucks blood.

[9] “Turner, peintures et aquarelles de la Tate, ” Jacquemart-André Museum, Paris, May 2020-Januart 2021. This quotation was included as part of the wall text appearing between the paintings “Vue imaginaire de l’arsenal” 1840 and “Un paysage idéalisé italien” 1828-1829 implying explicitly that the artist was visually interpreting the locations of his paintings rather than truthfully depicting them.

[10] Detail shared in 2015 from my doctoral fieldwork in Trinidad (TT), PhD thesis “Pretty Mas’: Visuality and Performance in Trinidad and Tobago’s contemporary carnival, West Indies” EHESS, Paris France, 2018.

[11] Santa Cruz is a valley situated in the north of the island.

[12] Nang by Nang-2018.

[13] Her most recent ongoing project: Bush (2019)

[14] My emphasis.

Maica Gugolati, docteur en anthropologie sociale et visuelle et travaille actuellement de l’EHESS (France), a collaboré pendant ses études aux résidences d’ Alice Yard(Trinidad & Tobago). Depuis lors elle continue à s’impliquer dans le domaine artistique. Elle participe au blog de recherche Decolonial Dialogues et à la revue Festival Culture Research Education. En 2019, elle a organisé une exposition virtuelle de recherche en reliant art, anthropologie et biologie. En octobre 2020, une exposition en ligne a été lancée sur la plateforme Art Curator Grid, où elle collabore avec huit artistes des Antilles, de Singapour, de la RDC, du Pakistan et des États-Unis. C’est aussi une artiste. Son dernier projet sur les paysages des Caraïbes a été présenté à la galerie d’art de l’ONCA au Royaume-Uni en 2020

List of publications of the last two years:

2020- with Jorge E. Ramírez, “Floating Herstories: Sound Project. A helicalcollaborative process.” in Ethnographic Ear, Ethnologia Polona, edited by Piotr Cichocki. Vol 39 (2018), pp. 51-69.

2020- Decolonial Dialogues research blog: “Decolonize Plans. A Flesh Call.” Autoethnography case https://decolonialdialogue.wordpress.com/2020/05/27/to-decolonize-plansaflesh-call/

2020- Curatorial Practice and correlated articles: AllegraLab, Virtual Museum, “On the Fluid Mosaic, transdisciplinary project between art, anthropology and biology.” https://allegralaboratory.net/on-the-fluid-mosaic/

2020- [Pending Publication] “I play myself. Some of its plural meanings in carnival, Trinidad and Tobago (WI)” Kingston: Ian Randle Publishers.

2020- [Pending Publication] “ ‘Today is not massa day come back, but massa day gone black!’ Class and colorism controversies in contemporary carnival performance,

Trinidad and Tobago, WI.” Edited by Philip Scher, In Caribbean and Caribbean Diaspora, London: Routledge Worlds.

2020- “Trasïte.” Of(f) the archive edizioni. Ed. by Tatsuo inagaki, Francesco Marano et al. Art-Anthropology Installation, Catalogue of the Anthropology/Art exhibition Chiaromonte 2017, University of Basilicata, Italy. ISBN 9788894466126

2019- with Cécile Vermot, “Parody, satire and the rise of populism under postcolonial criticism: an Italian and a French case”. Edited by Adrián Scribano, Maximiliano E. Korstanje, Freddy Alex Timmermann López. In Populism and Postcolonialism, 31-47. London: Routledge.

2018- “Creation of an exportable culture: a cosmopolitan West Indian case” In Honor of Stuart Hall African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal DOI: 10.1080/17528631.2018.1451597 April 2018.

2018- “La Djablesse: Between Martinique, Trinidad (and Tobago), and its Pan-Caribbean Dimension” Women, Gender, and Families of Color, Illinois Press University, Volume 6, Number 2, Fall 2018.